Cinnamon and Longevity

Back a few articles ago (as you know) I started talking about different foods, drinks, and vitamin supplements that I ingest on a daily basis to increase the strength of my immune system and add to my overall health and longevity. This whole thing was originally kicked off with my post about oranges. Today is really no different, except the topic shifted slightly… Let’s dig in!

Cinnamon is loaded with fiber, calcium, and iron. It also lowers blood sugar levels! And, has been shown to help with diabetes! So, why wouldn’t you take a daily dose??

You can add it to fruit juice, milk, tea, or other liquids. I simply stir a tablespoon (just over 6 grams) into water at the same time with my fiber and put it down like some freaky concoction from Dr. Jekyll’s laboratory… But, I’m kind of weird. Make sure you pick something that will taste good to you, so that you’ll do it each and every day! Start Today!

Before we talk about the benefits, let’s discuss what it is, and where it comes from… Cinnamon is a spice that comes from wild trees native to the Caribbean, South America, and Southeast Asia. And, there’s two main types of cinnamon: Ceylon and Cassia (Chinese cinnamon). Mankind has been consuming the spice for at least 4,000 years! For more than 1,000 years, cinnamon has been used for it’s medicinal value and doctors have given it to cure many ailments.

Editor’s Note (added after article was published): My friend, Jeanie Zak, pointed out that Ceylon is the “true cinnamon” that gives the most benefits. I did a little research and found that my McCormick Cinnamon; which says, “Canela Molida” (means “ground cinnamon”) is actually the cassia type. My research unveiled that cassia is cheaper and more common. Further searching and reading revealed an even scarier thing… Cassia has a much higher dosage of coumarin, which is an anticoagulant… This is particularly bad for hemophiliacs!!! Thanks for pointing me in the right direction, Jeanie. I will switch immediately!

 

These days, research has shown that cinnamon can help with diarrhea, muscle spasms, vomiting, infections, common cold, loss of appetite, and even erectile dysfunction (sign me up!)

Cinnamon might also lower blood sugar in people with type 1 or 2 diabetes. It has been shown to help improve glucose and lipids levels. Supposedly, cinnamon will reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. That alone is more than enough reason to take it!

Research is also pointing to cinnamon helping to prevent Alzheimer’s disease, and stopping the destructiveness of Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

In addition, recent investigations are pointing to cinnamon helping fight HIV. I’m not sure where it will lead, but I love the idea of trying!

Some of my friends like to mix cinnamon with honey (especially local honey) to help prevent allergies, but studies show there’s not any proof that this works.

Do you take a daily dose of cinnamon? If so, how do you take it?

Enjoy staying healthy,
Vaughn

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About Vaughn Ripley

Vaughn is a happily married daddy, author, and CIO. He is an HIV+ hemophiliac, and is one of the longest surviving HIV+ people in the universe.
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Comments

  1. Just an FYI, the local honey is the allergy symptom relief portion of the mixture (contains the allergans which seemed to help me immensely this year), the cinammon just comes along for the ride for the additional benefits described and tastes great with the honey. I’m going to have my son try it this coming year to see if it helps him.

    • Awesome to hear, Mike. I am planning to give this a go and see if it helps me with my allergies. Thanks for sharing!

    • I take honey and cinnamon ever morning, through out the day I feel great. I mix them together there you go. I tried the pill form of cinnamon, just ended up coming up,not good. So the honey and cinnamon works much better, just be sure to mix it will.then there gos your day. Have a blessed day. God bless.

  2. Is there a cinnamon pill?!

  3. Dan McNally says:

    A teaspoon of honey mixed with a teaspoon of cinnamon is a great start to the day . . . and don’t forget Atomic Fireballs, another awesome delivery system!

  4. I put local honey and a generous heap of cinnamon on oatmeal in the morning for me and my kiddo. I’m not sure if we’re getting health benefits or not, but it sure tastes yummy!

  5. I am like Andrea, i always add it to my oatmeal, plus fresh or frozen fruit (depending on the season). Always add honey or real maple syrup, and there’s more–my yummy Aldersgate Granola! We have volunteered at this wonderful Camps and Retreat Center in Oregon for so many years, they gave me the recipe, w hichI am willing to share 🙂 Elizabeth

    • Hi Elizabeth!

      Those are great ideas too. As I said, I simply add it to water and that is pretty tough to swallow (no pun intended). I love the yummy ideas. Thank you so much for the comment and support!

      -Vaughn

  6. Does cinnamon has an expiration date? How long can you keep it on your shelf?

    • Hi Sandra,

      There are a lot of variables that go into this question… Was it stored away from sunlight? Was it stored below 69 degrees? Was it sealed airtight? And so on… My normal rule of thumb is that my cinnamon can go one year past the “use by” date. I do not know of any hard-fast rules on this, but I simply follow this for mine. I did a little research and found that most people agree (somewhere near) with my guidelines.

      Thanks for such an awesome question!

      -Vaughn

  7. Just an FYI, even though Ceylon is the “True Cinnamon” and Cassia contains Cuminin, Cassia is more effective at lowering blood sugar levels than Ceylon cinnamon.

    • Mike,

      Thanks for the comment! Agreed. They both have pros and cons and good and bad. I only mention the bleeding problems because I am a hemophiliac and have many readers with bleeding disorders. It would be a diservice if I didn’t mention it. I avoid the Cassia, because I was getting spontaneous bleeds and bruising while on a daily dose.

      -V

  8. Jerry Hirschinger says:

    I’m not an expert, but I’ve been impressed that coumadin is a blood-thinner – not the same as coumarin in cinnamon. Coumarin is known to cause liver damage, but is not an anticoagulant.

    • Jerry Hirschinger says:

      BTW, I eat mine as a generous sprinkle into my morning smoothie. You can find Ceylon Cinnamon much more easily on the internet than in the store.

Trackbacks

  1. […] There are two primary types of cinnamon and each offers different benefits. I only use ceylon, not canela molida. This is mostly because of my bleeding disorder, but my research has also revealed the benefits of ceylon to be better (in my humble opinion). Read more about cinnamon here. […]

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